The highest paid graduate finance roles in Europe

Christel Deskins

© Provided by City AM Graduates who land highly sought after roles in finance could be paid as much as £43,797, a new survey has found. Currency firm Money Transfers has collated a list of Europe’s best paid graduate jobs in the financial sector. Read more: 7,500 UK finance jobs […]



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© Provided by City AM


Graduates who land highly sought after roles in finance could be paid as much as £43,797, a new survey has found.

Currency firm Money Transfers has collated a list of Europe’s best paid graduate jobs in the financial sector.

Read more: 7,500 UK finance jobs shifted to EU since historic vote, as hard Brexit edges closer

But although most university leavers would leap at a £40,000-plus salary to work as an investment analyst, it’s not even half the best rate on the continent.

That can be found in Switzerland, where the best paid job for a new starter – finance associate – rakes in £93,379.

Next come traditional banking strongholds Liechtenstein and Luxembourg, where trainee auditors get £71,760 and investment analysts £71,473 respectively.

The remainder of the top paid roles come from the north of the continent, with Scandinavian nations heavily represented.

By contrast, roles in the south are often worth around half what there northern counterparts are being paid.

The highest paid graduate finance role in each European country

There are on average 27,000 searches for graduate roles in the finance industry every month.

Read more: Women in finance body launches major research project

The current highest paying graduate finance role information was not available for the following European countries: Andorra, Armenia, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Georgia, Iceland, Malta, Moldova and San Marino.

The post Revealed: The highest paid graduate finance roles in Europe appeared first on CityAM.

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