Jupiter Fund Management’s(LON:JUP) Share Price Is Down 61% Over The Past Three Years.

Christel Deskins

If you love investing in stocks you’re bound to buy some losers. But the long term shareholders of Jupiter Fund Management Plc (LON:JUP) have had an unfortunate run in the last three years. Regrettably, they have had to cope with a 61% drop in the share price over that period. […]

If you love investing in stocks you’re bound to buy some losers. But the long term shareholders of Jupiter Fund Management Plc (LON:JUP) have had an unfortunate run in the last three years. Regrettably, they have had to cope with a 61% drop in the share price over that period. The more recent news is of little comfort, with the share price down 41% in a year. Furthermore, it’s down 21% in about a quarter. That’s not much fun for holders.

See our latest analysis for Jupiter Fund Management

There is no denying that markets are sometimes efficient, but prices do not always reflect underlying business performance. One way to examine how market sentiment has changed over time is to look at the interaction between a company’s share price and its earnings per share (EPS).

During the three years that the share price fell, Jupiter Fund Management’s earnings per share (EPS) dropped by 16% each year. The share price decline of 27% is actually steeper than the EPS slippage. So it’s likely that the EPS decline has disappointed the market, leaving investors hesitant to buy. The less favorable sentiment is reflected in its current P/E ratio of 10.91.

The graphic below depicts how EPS has changed over time (unveil the exact values by clicking on the image).

earnings-per-share-growth

It’s good to see that there was some significant insider buying in the last three months. That’s a positive. That said, we think earnings and revenue growth trends are even more important factors to consider. It might be well worthwhile taking a look at our free report on Jupiter Fund Management’s earnings, revenue and cash flow.

What About Dividends?

When looking at investment returns, it is important to consider the difference between total shareholder return (TSR) and share price return. Whereas the share price return only reflects the change in the share price, the TSR includes the value of dividends (assuming they were reinvested) and the benefit of any discounted capital raising or spin-off. So for companies that pay a generous dividend, the TSR is often a lot higher than the share price return. In the case of Jupiter Fund Management, it has a TSR of -51% for the last 3 years. That exceeds its share price return that we previously mentioned. And there’s no prize for guessing that the dividend payments largely explain the divergence!

A Different Perspective

While the broader market lost about 9.9% in the twelve months, Jupiter Fund Management shareholders did even worse, losing 36% (even including dividends). However, it could simply be that the share price has been impacted by broader market jitters. It might be worth keeping an eye on the fundamentals, in case there’s a good opportunity. Regrettably, last year’s performance caps off a bad run, with the shareholders facing a total loss of 6.3% per year over five years. Generally speaking long term share price weakness can be a bad sign, though contrarian investors might want to research the stock in hope of a turnaround. I find it very interesting to look at share price over the long term as a proxy for business performance. But to truly gain insight, we need to consider other information, too. Take risks, for example – Jupiter Fund Management has 3 warning signs we think you should be aware of.

If you like to buy stocks alongside management, then you might just love this free list of companies. (Hint: insiders have been buying them).

Please note, the market returns quoted in this article reflect the market weighted average returns of stocks that currently trade on GB exchanges.

This article by Simply Wall St is general in nature. It does not constitute a recommendation to buy or sell any stock, and does not take account of your objectives, or your financial situation. We aim to bring you long-term focused analysis driven by fundamental data. Note that our analysis may not factor in the latest price-sensitive company announcements or qualitative material. Simply Wall St has no position in any stocks mentioned.

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