Google’s new project management tool is called Tables, now out in beta form

Christel Deskins

Google is launching a new project management tool built by its Area 120 incubator called Tables. The project and task management tool brings features that rival the likes of Atlassian JIRA or Microsoft Project, letting users track the status of tasks, assign it to specific people, and automate some workflows […]

Google is launching a new project management tool built by its Area 120 incubator called Tables. The project and task management tool brings features that rival the likes of Atlassian JIRA or Microsoft Project, letting users track the status of tasks, assign it to specific people, and automate some workflows without any coding to help save time.

With Tables, the firm aims to help users keep a tab on projects and tasks without manually having to document them in separate places, making it difficult to collate and track when needed. Tables let users assign tasks to individuals, change owners based on the status, and automate workflows such as scheduling email reminders for overdue tasks using bots. The tool also provides several pre-built templates, the ability to integrate forms, and more. Users can also customize the view based on their preferences.

Naturally, Tables also integrates with Google services such as Sheets and Chat, letting users pull in data from Sheets and assigning them to groups in Google Groups or other contacts, or communicating through Chat.

Tables is being made available in the U.S. in beta form starting today. The firm is offering both free and paid tiers, with the latter providing perks such as the ability to have attachments up to 10GB and more. The paid tier costs $10 per month per user. The search giant is also letting users sign up for a free trial that lasts three months. You can head to the product page here to take a look at the offering.

Source Article

Next Post

Family launches nonprofit to help special needs children

Six-year-old Libby loves music. The Supremes make her eyes light up and a smile stretch across her face. That smile lets you see that she has lost her first tooth. That right of childhood passage is a little different for her though. No one knew exactly when her tooth fell […]