X1 Card, the Smartest Credit Card Ever Made, Opens Waitlist

SAN FRANCISCO–(BUSINESS WIRE)–X1 Card, the smartest credit card ever made, opened its waitlist for signups today. Built with 17g of stainless steel and laser etching technology, X1 Card reimagines the credit card from the ground up. It harnesses the power of technology to offer smart credit limits, an unparalleled rewards program, and automated features that will transform the way you shop and spend.

Smart features for better shopping

X1 Card uses proprietary smart technology that lets cardholders cancel subscription payments in one click, end free trials automatically with auto-expiring virtual credit cards, get instant notifications on refunds, attach receipts to purchases, and create virtual cards for one-time use. Cardholders will also be able to shop anonymously without disclosing their personal information.

An unparalleled rewards program for all your spend

The X1 Card gives points for every single purchase. The reward structure coupled with no annual fees is unmatched

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Gas station clerk spent thousands of dollars on customers’ stolen credit cards, police say

CASSELBERRY, Fla. – A 7-Eleven gas station clerk stole credit and debit card information from mostly elderly customers, called their banks to attempt to gain control of their accounts and made thousands of dollars in fraudulent purchases, according to the Casselberry Police Department.

All in all, Nykeshia Smith is accused of making $5,454.20 in purchases using three victims’ cards. Another victim was also identified but no money was stolen from her.

Police said the investigation began when a 74-year-old woman reported $964.26 in purchases were made on her debit card at Silver Star Mart in Ocoee, Big Lots, Sam’s Club and Discount Perk.

[TRENDING: DeSantis to lift restaurant limits in Fla. | Here’s how to track your mail-in ballot | How can I tell difference between flu and COVID-19?]

Records show the victim had stopped at a 7-Eleven days prior to the theft and forgotten her debit card in

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If Credit Card Relief’s a No-Go, Check Out Debt Management

As cardholders experience financial difficulties due to COVID-19, some credit card issuers are promoting their hardship programs.

Once a well-kept secret, these programs are now more prominently advertised, offering things like deferred payments and lower interest rates. But not all cardholders will qualify or receive favorable terms.

If you’ve been denied COVID-19 relief, if it’s insufficient, or if your relief terms are expiring, consider turning to a nonprofit credit counseling agency. Credit counselors may be able to help you with get-out-of-debt options — among them, possibly, a debt management plan, which rolls several balances into a single payment at a lower interest rate.

“It essentially works as a consolidation loan without creating a new loan,” says Thomas Nitzsche, a spokesperson for Money Management International, a nonprofit credit counseling agency.

Here’s what to know about this kind of assistance.

Hardship programs vs. debt management plans

Credit card hardship programs are ideal

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Capital One Announces Pricing, Expiration and Results of Cash Tender Offer for Notes Issued by Cabela’s Credit Card Master Note Trust

The MarketWatch News Department was not involved in the creation of this content.


MCLEAN, Va., Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire via COMTEX/ —
MCLEAN, Va., Sept. 28, 2020 /PRNewswire/ — Capital One Financial Corporation (NYSE: COF) (“Capital One”) announced today the pricing information (including the Interpolated Swap Rate and Purchase Price (each, as defined below)), the expiration and results of the previously announced offer (the “Offer”) by its subsidiary Capital One Bank (USA), National Association (“COBNA” or the “Offeror”) to purchase for cash any and all of the securities listed in the table below (the “Securities”) issued by Cabela’s Credit Card Master Note Trust (the “Trust”) from each registered holder of the Securities (the “Holders”).  The Trust was formed by WFB Funding, LLC, a Nebraska limited liability company, as depositor.  WFB Funding, LLC is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of COBNA and is the sole beneficial owner of the Trust.  COBNA acts

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How to Preserve Your Credit Score if You’ve Lost Your Job

Don’t let your unemployment situation wreck your credit. Do these things instead.

Millions of Americans have lost their jobs in the course of the coronavirus pandemic. That’s problematic not just from an income perspective, but from a credit score standpoint as well.

Unemployment benefits generally won’t replace your former paycheck in full. So, if you’ve lost your job, you may find you struggle to pay your bills. But unfortunately, the easiest way to wreck your credit is to fall behind on financial obligations, so take these steps to protect it.

1. Put your mortgage into forbearance

Falling behind on your mortgage could cause your credit score to plummet. But if you’re out of work, you may not be able to keep up with your regular payments. The solution? Ask your lender to put your loan into forbearance, which will allow you to pause your payments without being marked as delinquent.

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How To Pay Off $100K in Credit Card Debt

Paying off debt, whether it’s a big credit card balance or a personal loan, doesn’t just happen overnight. Instead, it’s something most people work toward for many months and years.

For Lynnette Khalfani-Cox, The Money Coach® and author of “Zero Debt: The Ultimate Guide to Financial Freedom,” it took nearly three years — and a lot of self-discipline — until she paid off a whopping $100,000 in credit card debt.

“I used credit as a crutch and as a lifestyle tool,” Khalfani-Cox tells CNBC Select. “When I didn’t have money for something, I whipped out a credit card.”

When Khalfani-Cox reached her early 30s, she started getting declined for purchases and new credit because her credit cards were maxed out. It was then that she realized her debt was a big problem.

She soon made it a point to finally get rid of her high balances and use her credit

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My Spouse Has Bad Credit. Will We Get a Mortgage?

A woman leaning over a man's shoulder as he sits in front of a laptop with his head resting in his hand and holds up a piece of paper.

Image source: Getty Images

There are plenty of good reasons to buy a home these days. If you’re working remotely due to the coronavirus pandemic, you may have a more flexible job schedule, which will make it easier to scope out homes and deal with your mortgage application. Also, mortgage rates are extremely low, so it pays to take advantage and lock a home loan in.

But what if you’re applying for a mortgage jointly with a spouse, and his or her credit score leaves much to be desired? Will you qualify for a mortgage if your credit score is strong, but your spouse’s isn’t?

When your spouse’s credit score needs work

You might assume that if your credit is great, but your spouse’s isn’t, mortgage lenders you will just average your two scores and go with that number. But that’s not really how it works. While your strong credit

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Agencies offer credit card relief

As cardholders experience financial difficulties due to COVID-19, some credit card issuers are promoting their hardship programs.

Once a well-kept secret, these programs are now more prominently advertised, offering things like deferred payments and lower interest rates. But not all cardholders will qualify or receive favorable terms.

If you’ve been denied COVID-19 relief, if it’s insufficient, or if your relief terms are expiring, consider turning to a nonprofit credit counseling agency. Credit counselors may be able to help you with get-out-of-debt options — among them, possibly, a debt management plan, which rolls several balances into a single payment at a lower interest rate.

“It essentially works as a consolidation loan without creating a new loan,” says Thomas Nitzsche, a spokesperson for Money Management International, a nonprofit credit counseling agency.

Here’s what to know about this kind of assistance.

Hardship programs vs. debt management plans


Credit card hardship programs are ideal

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Is credit card relief little help? Check out debt management

As cardholders experience financial difficulties due to COVID-19, some credit card issuers are promoting their hardship programs.

Once a well-kept secret, these programs are now more prominently advertised, offering things like deferred payments and lower interest rates. But not all cardholders will qualify or receive favorable terms.

        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        
        

 

If you’ve been denied COVID-19 relief, if it’s insufficient, or if your relief terms are expiring, consider turning to a nonprofit credit counseling agency. Credit counselors may be able to help you with get-out-of-debt options — among them, possibly, a debt management plan, which rolls several balances into a single payment at a lower interest rate.

“It essentially works as a consolidation loan without creating a new loan,” says Thomas Nitzsche, a spokesperson for Money Management International, a nonprofit credit counseling agency.

Here’s what to know about this kind of assistance.

HARDSHIP PROGRAMS VS. DEBT MANAGEMENT PLANS

Credit card hardship programs are ideal

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What to Do if You’re Approaching Retirement With Credit Card Debt

An older couple standing on the beach and looking at the sunset with their arms around each other.

Image source: Getty Images

Going into retirement debt-free is ideal, but unfortunately, it isn’t always possible. According to a study on credit card debt statistics done by The Ascent, the people with the most credit card debt are those aged 50 to 59 — just years from retirement age.

With the high interest rates on credit cards, carrying that debt into retirement can mean drastically less disposable income when you need it most. It can even mean drawing from your retirement accounts at a faster rate than planned and potentially running out of money. If you’re nearing retirement age with credit card debt, here’s how to get on top of the situation.

Focus on high-interest debt first

Your first priority should be paying off high-interest debt — an interest rate above 7% — such as credit card debt.

While it might be tempting to focus on growing your retirement accounts

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